Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Know Your Meme is an advertising supported site and we noticed that you're using an ad-blocking solution.

circle , from . cercle, from L. circulus "small ring," dim. of circus (.). Replaced . trendel and hring. Meaning "group of persons surrounding a center of interest" is from 1714; that of "coterie" is from 1640s; dim. form circlet is from late 15c. The verb is from late 14c.

Old English gan "to go, advance, depart; happen; conquer; observe," from West Germanic *gai-/*gæ- (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian gan , Middle Dutch gaen , Dutch gaan , Old High German gan , German gehen ), from PIE *ghe- "to release, let go" (cf. Sanskrit jihite "goes away," Greek kikhano "I reach, meet with"), but there is not general agreement on cognates.

The Old English past tense was eode , of uncertain origin but evidently once a different word (perhaps connected to Gothic iddja ); it was replaced 1400s by went , formerly past tense of wenden "to direct one's way" (see wend ). In northern England and Scotland, however, eode tended to be replaced by gaed , a construction based on go . In modern English, only be and go take their past tenses from entirely different verbs.

The word in its various forms and combinations takes up 45 columns of close print in the OED. Verbal meaning "say" emerged 1960s in teen slang. Colloquial meaning "urinate or defecate" attested by 1926. Go for broke is from 1951, American English colloquial; go down on "perform oral sex on" is from 1916. That goes without saying (1878) translates French cela va sans dire . As an adjective, "in order," from 1951, originally in aerospace jargon.

Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account.

Who among us is brave enough to challenge the mind of Alice Munro? To duel with Leon Rooke's dreams? Or--more daunting yet--to joust with sloppy student grammar? Douglas Glover is the knight-in-arms of contemporary fiction, and Attack of the Copula Spiders a stalwart defense of the literary arts--in an age where too few care for its craft.

Learn more

attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Old English gan "to go, advance, depart; happen; conquer; observe," from West Germanic *gai-/*gæ- (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian gan , Middle Dutch gaen , Dutch gaan , Old High German gan , German gehen ), from PIE *ghe- "to release, let go" (cf. Sanskrit jihite "goes away," Greek kikhano "I reach, meet with"), but there is not general agreement on cognates.

The Old English past tense was eode , of uncertain origin but evidently once a different word (perhaps connected to Gothic iddja ); it was replaced 1400s by went , formerly past tense of wenden "to direct one's way" (see wend ). In northern England and Scotland, however, eode tended to be replaced by gaed , a construction based on go . In modern English, only be and go take their past tenses from entirely different verbs.

The word in its various forms and combinations takes up 45 columns of close print in the OED. Verbal meaning "say" emerged 1960s in teen slang. Colloquial meaning "urinate or defecate" attested by 1926. Go for broke is from 1951, American English colloquial; go down on "perform oral sex on" is from 1916. That goes without saying (1878) translates French cela va sans dire . As an adjective, "in order," from 1951, originally in aerospace jargon.

Action Action

attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Action Action

attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

circle , from . cercle, from L. circulus "small ring," dim. of circus (.). Replaced . trendel and hring. Meaning "group of persons surrounding a center of interest" is from 1714; that of "coterie" is from 1640s; dim. form circlet is from late 15c. The verb is from late 14c.

Action Action

attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing
Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Old English gan "to go, advance, depart; happen; conquer; observe," from West Germanic *gai-/*gæ- (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian gan , Middle Dutch gaen , Dutch gaan , Old High German gan , German gehen ), from PIE *ghe- "to release, let go" (cf. Sanskrit jihite "goes away," Greek kikhano "I reach, meet with"), but there is not general agreement on cognates.

The Old English past tense was eode , of uncertain origin but evidently once a different word (perhaps connected to Gothic iddja ); it was replaced 1400s by went , formerly past tense of wenden "to direct one's way" (see wend ). In northern England and Scotland, however, eode tended to be replaced by gaed , a construction based on go . In modern English, only be and go take their past tenses from entirely different verbs.

The word in its various forms and combinations takes up 45 columns of close print in the OED. Verbal meaning "say" emerged 1960s in teen slang. Colloquial meaning "urinate or defecate" attested by 1926. Go for broke is from 1951, American English colloquial; go down on "perform oral sex on" is from 1916. That goes without saying (1878) translates French cela va sans dire . As an adjective, "in order," from 1951, originally in aerospace jargon.

Action Action

Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Action Action

attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Know Your Meme is an advertising supported site and we noticed that you're using an ad-blocking solution.

Action Action

attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

circle , from . cercle, from L. circulus "small ring," dim. of circus (.). Replaced . trendel and hring. Meaning "group of persons surrounding a center of interest" is from 1714; that of "coterie" is from 1640s; dim. form circlet is from late 15c. The verb is from late 14c.

Action Action

attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Action Action

Bootstrap Thumbnail Second

Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account.

Action Action

Bootstrap Thumbnail Third

Attack of the copula spiders and other essays on writing

Action Action

http://buy-steroids.org